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The Decade of DMB

By Jake Vigliotti
10/4/09

Tour of the Decade: 2009 I can already hear it, ďThat got so predictable at the end! Every show was the same, blah blah, teleblahÖĒ And I did hear that. I heard that in 2000. Yes, the beloved 2000 tour. And it did get redundant in the end. It happens. On the whole, however, 2009 wins out over 2000. How can you deny a tour with Halloween making regular appearances, and a few Blue Water Baboon Farmís, and then the random appearances of Recently, Song That Jane Likes, You Never Know, and Typical Situation push 2009 to the front of the class.

Rankings:


Best written song of the Decade, Lyrics category: You Never Know
Apologies to Lying In The Hands Of God, Bartender, and the Lillywhite version of Captain, You Never Know is a masterpiece. Itís arguably the most autobiographical song Dave wrote, telling of his own life in a nutshell, and how he got where he is today. Brilliant. Itís worth noting that not all deep songs have to be in that style, underrated in the lyrics department are Spaceman, Why I Am, and Hello Again.

Rankings:

Best song of the decade, in the category of TEH ENGEREZZ!!!: Grey Street
It opens shows, it closes shows, it wakes a crowd up, it gets everyone singing. Itís at the very least the most popular radio release among fans from this decade, and thatís all with a verse missing from the song! You can tell yourself that youíre tired of Grey Street, but youíre wrong. Youíre really not. It is that rare utility player of songs for DMB, and itís the ultimate mea culpa after a snoozer.

Rankings:

Best Song of the Decade, non-official release category: Monkey Man

I get the drama with the aborted Lillywhite Sessions, but the fact that Monkey Man never got a chance to be played again is a crime. I pictured that as an opener a la Seek Up or Bartender, or that mid show jam like The Dreaming Tree or Crush. Itís truly the only song that I think was never given a fair shake by the band. That and the 07.03.03 Sound Check song. I still hold out hope that itíll pop up one day, but Iím a delusional dreamer like that.

Rankings:

Unappreciated song of the decade: Baby

Itís so unappreciated you forgot about it. I know you did. When DMB started playing the Some Devil stuff, it seemed like Baby would fit an E1 slot. So much for that. Even in the Dave and Friends and Dave and Tim stuff from that time period, the song only managed eight plays. Itís a smart little song that gets no love.

Rankings:

Over-appreciated song of the decade: What You Are

We canít be all positive, thatíd ruin our repís. This isnít a song bashing episode, but rather these are songs that probably get either too much love in set list rotation, by a vocal minority of fans, or just have reached that ďmehĒ status with fans when they hear it. Itís shocking that What You Are actually used to close shows. The intro is longer than the song, and it somehow reached ďcoolĒ status because of an ďF-BombĒ adlibbed into the lyrics.

Rankings:

Live Release of the decade:Live Trax Vol.16

Did you really think we wouldnít pick the one we picked? But really, think of this: two Little Thing teases, a Build You A House tease, and then you get a very unique Grey Street, Sweet Up And Down, Say Goodbye, and One Sweet World with the original jam intro. Thatís pretty strong. And the show is the ďoriginal fiveĒ (which werenít the original five), from a great tour year. It gets props for that. Fine, we're biased. I can live with that.

Rankings:

Album of the decade: The Lillywhite Session

Yes, it counts. Yes, it does. Yes. Fine, call me names. Look at the legacy of the album; it nearly tore the band apart, it begot Everyday and Stand Up, but it also produced the best songs of the decade on the whole. Thereís no denying that. From top to bottom, the Lillywhite Sessions just works. Yes, itís dark, but sometimes Dark is good. And to borrow a line, sometimes out of the darkness comes light, like a flash. And in the end of the decade, the band produced their best stuff in 10 years. It gives everyone hope for the next decade, but it all happened because of what happened in 2000.

Rankings:

The views and comments expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of antsmarching.org.


   


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